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CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 1:20am EST
united states u.s. to lift the asia first and second strategy which has become a major issue. while most of the british try t down play that role and i think in retrospect, both sides had this validity and the argument, and by the time china had becom very important toward the end o 1943, 1944 the nature of the  had changed because the u.s. original strategy was to drive the japanese to the western pacific to the edge to go north and through the japan homeland. but by the end of 1943 to 44 particularly after the battle o the philippines. so the land route which was urgently planned by china have become much less significant. so that's why it is very mplex. >> professor why did you plan the attack in china in 1937? >> that is a long story. to make it short, both japan an china were military and economically in the 1930's and japan has a very different national psyche than the chinese. there are big, divided and deeply torn between the communist movement and the na
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
company" at the u.s. naval academy. this is part of book tv's college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> host: book tvs on location at the u.s. naval academy in a aanapolis. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> guest: i teach southeast asian history. i concentrate on tie lan and vietnam. >> host: why is it important for students to know southeast asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the vietnam war. many people who are official with the circ
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:30pm EST
, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you.Ñsr >> next, the interim america dialogue discusses the results of the november 6th elections and implications for latin america. panelists discuss the prospects for change with the obama add enrings' policies involving immigration, trade, drug policy, and economic cooperation. this is about an hour and ten minutes. >> this morning, we're going to have a conversation, a discussion, about the elections, november 6th elections in the united states, and what the results mean for u.s. relations and latin america, and the idea really is to have a good exchange and to engage everybody here to talk about what the significance of the outcome might be. we're going to start with the few opening remarks, and then invite, encourage you to share your insights about what the elections might mean. i'm joined this morning by three of my colleagues from the inter-
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:15pm EST
macris. permanent military professor at the u.s. naval academy. what does that title mean. >> guest: well, we represent the permanent military professors, a hybrid, a joining of the professor officer corps and professor and the professional educators here at the naval academy. i spent the first half of a naval career flying aircraft for the u.s. navy, and about ten years ago made the transition to academia, where the navy provided an outstanding opportunity to go back to graduate school and get a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >> host: and now an author. "the politics and security of the gulf" is the numb of your book. that's kind of a big topic. >> guest: it is. it's part of the world where the united states has been involved in three hot wars in the past generation, the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm, and operation iraqi freedom. it's a big topic, and it needs to be discussed, and investigated, which is part of the reason why we took on this topic. >> host: in your book, where do you begin talking about u.s. involvem
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
election day, what are coverage. coming up next, the u.s. air relations. including the discussion of the relationship between u.s., israel, and iran. then we will hear the "washington post" cybersecurity summit. we have several live events to tell you about tomorrow. gregorie dinero will be on to discuss the future of the army. and president obama's campaign rally at the university of colorado, boulder. that is on c-span. [cheers] [applause] >> all right, let's get what documents the coolidge family during the white house years. and also before. >> part of the coolidge family papers. we have one box of photographs. then we have several boxes of other documents. photographs are heavy. the album should be in the back here. here it is. unfortunately, it is on lack civics paper. there's not much we can do about that because we don't want to change the artifact nature of the album itself. starting to crack, some of these pages are separating. this is a photograph of calvin coolidge the day before he became president. he was in plymouth, vermont, visiting his father, doing some chores,
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
administration. there's -- next-day discussion on u.s. military deployments and the presence of u.s. troops around the world. this is 40 minutes. >> host: we turn to a discussion of the us military employment and the changing a home and abroad with phyllis bennett of the institute for politics studies. it's been on most years since the department defends releases strategic guiding stoppage that will provide a framework for the u.s. military footing in the foreseeable future. how is the military moving to enact this new policy and where are the threats that we will see in the coming years? >> guest: you know we haven't seen nearly the kind of shifts that we have been hearing about. we have been hearing about how we are winding down in afghanistan or in sense and yes there are 60,000 u.s. troops there in 100,000 u.s. paid contractors paid by the pentagon still occupying afghanistan. the one change we have seen this year has been the withdrawal of the finishing of the withdrawal from iraq. that is important because that was for so long the centerpiece of where u.s. troops were fighting around
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 1:00pm EST
country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is a work of philosophy. the principal question is under what circumstances can a statey ask more demand to know the secrets of its citizens.y there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? >> the geneva convention to protect pow's signed in 1948. >> and how did that come about? what will does it play inyyy interrogation?yyyyyyy >> sure.yyyyyyyy throughout much of the historyy of warfare, prisoners-of-waryy were treat
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 5:00pm EST
our next speaker, u.s. senator-elect ted cruz from texas. it was two years ago when ted cruz came up to me and others here in this room saying he was contemplating a run for the u.s. senate and asked for reaction. trying hard not to pour water over ted's noble commitment to public service, i resisted what would roll out of our topings -- tongues when a friend confronts us with advise. are you crazy? do you have a fever? have you sought professional help for this behavior? [laughter] taking a slightly different tact, i asked the usual questions. is it the right time politically? do you think the money's there? is your family prepared for this? have you checked all the necessary boxes back home in texas? now, as any of you know ted would guess, looked reflective and discerning at the questions, but you knew he was optimistic and just raring to go. he wanted to do this. from the experiences with the bush campaign and his bid for attorney regime, he knew he was ready for the political fray, and while he probably was not sure whether the timing was right electorally, he knew from the expe
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 5:00pm EST
convinced that there was a very large conspiracy usually involving figures in the u.s. government and a massive cover-up. >> literally 82 days. he presided over the seine at an hour days the vice president doesn't bother with that. he was there every day presiding everything from fdr with the transition of ciro knowledge. that doesn't happen anymore. got a phone call from the white house, get to the phone right away and at the other and they said get to the white house as soon as you can. so he grabbed his hat and he dashed out and he had a car of course he was to get upstairs to the second floor which was the family for and he looked up and said the president is dead and he was in total shock and he said what can i do for review and he said what can we do for you? you are in trouble now. >> we look at the life of harry truman now for our federal election commission chairman potter on super pacs and a discussion hosted by the atlantic, the astana institute and the newseum part of their washington ideas for rum. it's about a half-hour. >> so, next we are going to find out whether the bil
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 6:00am EST
the u.s. it's possible you could see the end of the arab spring at that conference held at columbus university in 2008. there's a matter of the public diplomacy people coming into the state department are often shunted off into consular work for eight years or whatever, for a long time before the ever get to any public diplomacy were. it's as though you're in the military and call your officers and send them off to, i don't know, do social work and then suddenly brought them back and said now you're in charge of the squadron. well anyway, but -- >> well, thank you, ambassador. and by the way, as far as the arab spring is concerned, i know that i was personally accused by some right wing bloggers having omitted the arab spring but i wish it were true, because of this event. although the event enabled me to do. the thing that was most fun of all of all the things that it did when i was undersecretary, which was that i got to call on the egyptian ambassador. i don't know if you really does, and made them come to my office and dressing gown which is sort of a great thing you can do trad
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 1:45pm EST
screen now, professor of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete ways because that is with they responded to positively. once he had that in sight he ran with it and develop what they became the harvard of the middle east. >> is is still open? >> it is time indeed. weathered many tough years. it remains open and stay that way even through the tou
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 9:00am EST
has no relationship whatsoever with congress on either side. u.s. virtually no interaction with members of congress. wow. >> let me, mark, let me just add, first of all, i don't agree with anything charlie just said. now, i agree with everything charlie just said. the key may be whether the president shows decisive leadership. now, i don't know what you all think they're i don't know what charlie thinks. i don't think that decisive leadership necessary is what is shown a lot of the time in the first term. it's not that he didn't show any leadership. he staked out general positions, suggestions, ideas, philosophies, the health care reform. but he didn't get his hands really dirty. remember the public option fight we had. where was the president? if you send it to me, i'll sign it. you know, he let nancy pelosi take the lead on the public option. and on a lot of things, you know, we knew where he stood. he didn't twist arms. he just didn't seem to get involved in the details. is he going to do that now? if he does that, easy going to just come his idea of well, i've got a second t
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 9:30am EST
separate it from my parents, and then being brought here to the u.s. as a child by my parents, it's very common. i mean, when i was researching this topic, i learned that 80% of the latin american children in u.s. schools get separated from a parent in the process of migration. so i mean, that's a whole lot of kids that are being separated from parents, who are coming here, you know, as undocumented child immigrants. so definitely my experience is not unique, but not, there's not a whole lot of awareness, you know, or when people talk about immigration, very seldom do they consider, you know, that other side of immigration, which is the children who get left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with her parents. and we don't talk about how immigration breaks up families and how, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this. because you know, it's something that it's an experience that definitely scarred me, that has really like shaped the woman i am today, and then also an experience that i think right now with
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 11:00am EDT
] >> the book is titled "the shadow catcher: a u.s. agent infiltrates mexico's deadly crime cartels". to my left is c.a. heifner. [applause] >> the title of his book is "mule: my dangerous life as a dug smuggler turned dea informant". we have a very interesting and lively set of books here and i will start by asking chris how he became involved in the drug business. >> my wife is sort of the american dream brought back. i was a college graduate and had everything going for me but i was living with my pregnant girlfriend at the time and we have a 5-year-old daughter. christmas was two weeks away and we were being evicted. i had no one to turn to and nothing to sell, no options. i turned to a friend who i thought would just give me a loan because he was in the drug business. little did i know he was basically trying to groom me because he wanted -- to didn't look like a typical meal. he loaned me the money and he had his hook in to me at that point because i only asked for a couple thousand dollars and he immediately offered several more than that. there's no way you can say no when you are i
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:00pm EST
largely by leftist historians, and the u.s. acquired an empire with cuba and the philippines. if this were only revealed the deep differences between america and everyone else in history when one of the first things the american congress did after the war was castellon required the united states to give up cuba. one searches in vain for major world powers who ever voluntarily departed from concorde regions. the 20 century dawned a group of liberal elites who embraced the program loosely known as progressivism, challenging these criticized pillars. mr. has still to common law as president woodrow wilson being a prime example of one who thought the constitution needed to be malleable in direct society. if america stood on the edge of leadership, europe entered a decade which convinced itself or with impossible. the book grand ablution captured the view europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes at the precipice in this observation about how the world recite together, hot englishman could order from the store steps product from faraway la
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 9:30am EST
, history and histography and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon "patriot's history of the united states" is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's v. of the modern world -- version of the modern world." please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor, and it's one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastions of liberty in a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably didn't know that you were getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my experiences in the rock band were actually pretty informative. i tell my students i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and starved. [laughter] when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states" in 2004, we identified th
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
replied they had, pat asked about her stay in the u.s. and implied what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glimpse of the president before she went home. have been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i use this story to begin my topic because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat nixon public role. more particularly as foreign diplomat. patton at the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job as a political wife. second, this is not the wife of ambassador or statesmen. she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact server trouble to import people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sinister
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:40pm EST
. tonight. >> booktv sat down with wayne hsieh. it's just under 20 minutes. >> u.s. naval academy, west pointers and the civil war, is your book. what do you mean by the old army? >> guest: the old army is a term commonly used by historians. actually it's a time from the time period referring to the regular army. there's a joke that the old army is the army before every war. so there's a bunch of old army. so my book actually starts with the professionalization of the army and it's about how that process occurs and plays out in the civil war. >> host: give us a snapshot of what the old army, prior the war of 1812, was like. >> guest: before the war of 1812, and this is drawing on really historical literature by historians -- the army before the war of 1812 is a nonprofessional. it over corps obtained their positions through political influence, and as a consequence they're not -- because they're not professionals who went through a body of education and were promoted by some system of merit, they don't perform very well during the war of 1812 so washington, dc burned. the early at
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 3:45pm EST
asked about her stay in the u.s. and implied on what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained that she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the engagement. i used the story because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat and her public role. particularly about the role of foreign diplomats. first, she met the woman during one of her travels as first lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job. as a political wife. second, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and had come out to see the second lady and see the united states to study. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. there, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party they were out in the engagement they were going to or
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 4:45pm EST
american college of obstetrics and gynecology pushback. the issue a statement that said the u.s. of consent system cannot afford the cost at its current price without significant negative repercussions. in this case the company backed down. this is the exception rather than the rule and individual patient still have the power to put pressure to reduce their hospital bill econ so we have a problem of one controlled prices in american health care at the time when 32 million people will be getting coverage. we also have an interesting situation a recent study in the archives of internal medicine was a survey of physicians primary-care physicians 42% of them believe their patients received too much medical care. 25% of them believe that they themselves provide too much medical care. the good news is about 75% of the surveyed said they are interested in learning how the practice compares to other doctors so they can have unnecessary medical treatment. as young residents you have the opportunity to do that and i'd sure with the leadership you will learn how to do that, and you should. he
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
be construed to authorize the detention of u.s. citizens or lawful resident aliens who are captured inside the united states unless -- and this is a big "unless" -- an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. as i read the amendment, it says that the military detention of u.s. citizens may be authorized in accordance with the law of war as long as this action is expressly authorized by congress. further, the amendment's requirement for express authorization applies only to the detention of u.s. citizens who are captured inside the united states, so no such authorization would be required for detention of a u.s. citizen in the course of military operations overseas. i believe it is appropriate that congress focus on the issue of military detention at the time that they authorize the use of military force. as would be required by the feinstein amendment. as the supreme court has stated, detention is a fundamental and accepted incident to armed conflict. without such authority, our armed services could be put in the untenable position of being able to shoot to kill but not
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
, each classroom displayed a world map that put the u.s. squarely in the center of the world. the eurasian continent was split into, as parentheses to the u.s. in order to accommodate this you. i believe i have struggled against this distortion of the u.s. is both literal and symbolic place in the world all my life. we are close in age. so i wonder if you encounter the same perpetual distortion and subsequent challenge? you have 30 seconds. >> absolutely something i write about in don't know much about geography. specifically, most of us grew up with a certain, what is called, projection of the world. greenland looks like it is big, if up in africa. so, as things get turned around and given proportionally, i also included in that book of maps that just turns north and south america upside-down. what would happen if we looked at -- there's no reason we can look at it that way. north doesn't have to be a top. we could put south of the top who wanted to. >> host: we will have to leave it there. i apologize. out of time. kenneth davis has been our guest here on "in-depth". and whose i
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
public forum with the north dakota candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to e
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
the woman replied that they had come a pat asked about her stay in the u.s. acquired wishers in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. i've been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech. nixon then lost the hearts are continuing to the previous engagement. i use the story to be different type visit to exemplify several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as foreign diplomat. the path that a woman during one of her trial a second review. the traveling she does was the best part of her job as a political wife. sector, is not the wife of ambassador were statesmen. she was just a young woman who would come to the united states versus the second lady and had come to the united states to study. she treated everyone should not as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sensors and scared and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her role when she could take ac
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 8:00pm EST
state senator, in the u.s. senator, and when you read the audacity of hope, his book about his all-together brief senate career. it's clear he's not an ideolog. i -- i always thought that, you know, the idea of him as a socialist or whatever was just a smear. >> how did he get painted that way, or was there an element of truth to it? >> this is quite a bit about what the next book is about -- >> margaret talked bow -- >> the smear, there was a concerted effort started even before he became president, but really accelerated in 2009 to destroy him politically for the purposes of regaining power, and so it was not a conspiracy, but there were a lot of people who had, you know, a similar interest in trying to paint him as something that he was not. i mean, we all know about the whole birther movement and everything. one of the amazing parts about that is that how far it moved into the mainstream where you could hear nonsense on the floor of the congress or from board rooms. i mean, if you stop -- we're so used to it, we don't stop to think about how completely insane it is. what would
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
. as the largest fuel consumer in the world today and by far the largest in the u.s. government, as i said, 93%, the department of defense has a special role to play, and moreover, because of our dependence on foreign sources of energy we continually send our men and women in uniform in harm's way to maintain that access to oil. the second criticism we often hear is that biofuels are too expensive. now, it is true that advanced biofuels are not yet in full production and so they can't compete with oil, since the oil market is a hundred years old, but d.o.d. investment has caused the price to drop dramatically over the last two years, and biofuels are more immune from price shots than -- than oil. there are also significant costs to traditional foreign sources of energy that are not shown at the gas pump. those costs are associated with protecting our shipping lanes and oil supplies and for over 60 years we've been trolling the -- patrolling the persian gulf, these costs for oil remain underappreciated. for our military the issue of energy security investment in biofuels is simple. d
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
congressional numbers, we are in a new day where we can run candidates for u.s. senate where the battle is over who is dongle for the middle-class, not about their personal lives. this is the first time it really cemented itself. >> is that from winning the award you think? >> i think it was some level of decency. we did not see any evidence of that in this cycle. it's still going going to come back in certain places but that race in particular showed some unlike tammy who has done her work and work your tail off for years and years was -- it means we can elect u.s. senators and eventually u.s. presidents and that is not the primary issue of the campaign. >> can you talk about the strategy and you guys have all discussed this but there has been a long winning streak of the marriage referendum. how did you turn that around? >> look, patrick and i were in that same hotel in san francisco on election night only four years ago where there was two ballrooms, one for prop 8 and one for obama. if you look at all that has happened in that movement in just those four years, one, these cam
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
, including libya, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 11:00pm EST
prestige and rankings. it seems like there's agreement among the panelists that rankings like u.s. news and world report are, shall we say, flawed, and not basedded on outcome, and, yet, universities widely promote the fact that they are -- they gain standing in those rankings, and sometimes you can use those at goals. does that make anybody uncomfortable? does that lend credibility to the rankings? are we just stuck with that fact or is there another approach? >> i think if you look at the web page of any university, what you'll see on the web page is whatever publicity the university is getting, and i mean, i actually have done research that shows when you fall in the rankings, all sorts of bad things happen. fewer people apply. it's more difficult to get the students to come. you have to give more financial aid. test scores go down. the rankings do matter, and people say they don't pay attention to them, but that's not the only thing they pay attention to, and so, you know, i think the message is, you can convey on your web pages and written documentation what are values, what
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:30am EDT
keeps the rain forest by brent is that you have the canopy coming in outcome and the u.s. economy would be good big firms coming ge, gm, wal-mart, all that. and then he got small business, but it's the small and growing. it's sickening that were small and can challenge the date and what happens in the big tree falls over. again, the amazing thing is new trees grow right out of the old trees. that is a metaphor, but it's real. because i'm really something big in the economy, it's vital we know how to reconfigure resources and create some new out of it. so do we need control? we need feed back. we need the capabilities to repurpose. in this country, we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to this country and that's why people here look for a better future that will be like the better future that their ancestors looked to when they came. so you know, i would say yes, you know, we need control, but we need controls. all kinds of interdependencies, all kinds of self regulations and ways of understanding what's happe
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 1:00am EST
>>> booktv recently sought with michael skerker of the u.s. naval academy to talk about his book an ethics of interrogation. this interview is part of book tv's college series. it's about 20 minutes. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do in booktv is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland and joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book. published by the university of chicago press. professor skerker, what do you do with theb academy? >> i teach the ethics class all the youngsters have to take and a number to loss of one studies to request to reduce the ethics of interrogation in your book is the philosophical books worth how to interrogate?y >> guest: >> it is the principal question number one circumstances can the state asked.yyyyyyy then there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? spec the geneva
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2012 9:00am EST
in my work here in the u.s. senate. before doing so i would like to outline my thinking on this issue and set out the principles that has guided my decision. in answering this, who will you caucus with question repeatedly with during the campaign, and i emphasize the word repeatedly, i established two basic criteria, that i wanted to maintain my independence as long and as thoroughly as possible, while at the same time being effective in my representation of maine. the first option i considered was whether i could literally go it alone. and not align myself with either party and operate entirely outside of the current partisan structure of the senate. although tempting in many ways, it is become apparent from extensive research into the senate rules and precedents as well as discussions with those familiar with the operations of the senate that this simply wouldn't be practical. and in fact, would severely compromise my ability to be effective on behalf of maine. the principle disadvantage of this go it alone approach is that i would likely be largely exed committee process which is w
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 7:00am EST
and to talk just for a moment about the u.s. competitiveness and the u.s. economy in a global context. and their actually was an oecd report that came out this morning that does that admirably. this report predicts that within four years, by 2016, the chinese economy will be bigger than the economy. and what the oecd report sort of further says, it's a great report. if you're interested, take a look online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president. >> i continue think that -- don't think that castro had a ai directns demand the assassinatin de plotri against the american t president. mo but i do describe in the book -- some of the most startling information i aimierd one of them particular a detector whofe was the highest level most knowledgeable cuban intelligence officer to defect to the united states. he and told me that he was conve that castro knew and cuban intelligence knew in advance that lee harvey os ward was going to b shoot at jack kennedy that morning in dallas. >> bryan will latell. here is the book castro secret." the cia and cuba's intelligence machine.ck it unfortunately we ran out ofs time. you have to pick it up and read it for yourself.ng it's unfortunate. it's a good story. bryan, thank you for joins us on booktv here in miami. >> thank you so much. >>> is there a non-fiction author or book you would like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@c-span.org. or tweet us@twitter.com/booktv. >>> novellest james
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 2:45pm EST
inequality" and paul krugman, author wrote train to talk about problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour 45 next on booktv. [applause] >> well, thank thank you very m. thanks to the passionate attitude and technology in shakespeare books for hosting the event this evening. i also am very excited. i think we are all very excited to see probably two people who i would say are unquestionably the most cited economists in the world today. [applause] in addition to being most cited, and as you all know, those are noble laureates, i would have to say from the vantage point of the institute of economic thinking that if i were to nominate two people as being the most courageous economists in the world and the most impactful, the subpoena to find a list. so we're very excited to be part of this conversation. [applause] as you know, each of them has written a book that pertains to our current challenges and circumstance. joe stiglitz spoke, "the price of inequality" and paul krugman's book, "end this depression now!" are part of your goodie bag tonight. therefore on behalf of them i w
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 9:30am EST
quick numbers. in the 1970s, the top 1% accounted for roughly 10% of the national income in the u.s.. that number now is above 25%. what is more striking is the top 0.1%, 10% of the 1% is now close to 8% so 10% of the 1% is today with increasing distance of where the 1% was in the 70s. i am not talking about incumbent wealth. if you take the wealth of two admittedly hugely rich people, bill gates and warren buffett, their wealth is equal to the collective wealth of the bottom 40% of the income distribution in the united states. two got a very cool to the bottom 1 twenty million americans. that is pretty big. interestingly, this was a surprise. i sold my book to the publishers in september of 2008 just before the financial crisis and then the crisis happened and many people were sad and i had a particular reason for sorrow because i thought the entire premise of my book is gone. the superelite is over. this financial crisis has happened, surely this system is going to change completely and these superfortunes will be wiped out and there will be a real calibration. i wrote a new book
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 11:00pm EST
members. we are adding new day where we can run candidates for the u.s. senate, the battle is over and this is the first time that really cemented it. >> it would've worked? >> i think they deserve some level of decency. oftentimes, the public would use it in a very quiet way. we didn't see hardly any evidence of that in the cycle. but still, it will come back in certain places. it is a credit to someone like tammy baldwin, who did her work. someone who is dignified, it means that we have elected senators and presidents eventually end that sexual orientation is not the primary issue in the campaign. >> so how did you turn that around? how did you and that? >> well, if you look, patrick and i were in that same hotel in san francisco on election night. you look at all that has happened in the movement in just the last four years. these campaigns and all the organizations in the movement have gotten very sophisticated. they came out of it with a sort of sugarcoated hate campaign. he used to come out of the very direct and overt thing. all the advertisements they came at us during prop
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:30pm EST
challenge to the u.s. constitution in today's society? >> well, i did touch on an earlier. in terms of applying the constitution, i do think it is the technology. i mean, all of the dna is obvious for examples. you can be exonerated through dna evidence. far more often, it is used in the catch. is it a search and seizure with a tweezer full of skin and see if it matches something else. it is very difficult and there are difficult questions about that sort. we had a case with gps, you know, you could slap a gps on it and they have complete itinerary. it turned out that the guy was going in a direction typical of search and seizure. the new technology is a amazing. the technology is just amazing. it will be a good test to see how the framework they set up in the constitution can, as it has for more than 200 years, how it can be used in dealing with these new challenges. >> do you have a judicial philosophy that you apply? in interpreting these changes that could not have possibly been anticipated? >> i don't want the answer to be flippant, but the answer is no. i said this at my confirma
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 9:00am EST
american politics? nine, ron paul says the election shows that the u.s. is now far gone. okay. but are we really seeing a strong resurgence of it to support her moxie with a hole that needs of new participants? and i think curtis gans may want to talk about it. and, finally, number 10, as we relate to substance, for our fiscal cliff and monumental decisions affecting the debt, deficit, sequestration, taxes, and everything else this country faces, one in the election result puts us closer to a solution? so given those 1015 questions that i don't know anybody in right on because i did myself lastly, i turned over to my distinguished colleague, john fortier. thank you all. >> now we will quiz the panelists on those questions, but what we're going to do, i'm going to introduce the panelist. each of us will give a five or six minute take on what we than most important about the election, we will have a little discussion and then go to the audience. i'm going to keep the buyers brief. you have them in your chairs, these are very accomplished people, if we spent all or someone that we would h
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
no reason for us to believe that we've run out of steam. >> i feel like i'm back in the u.s. election talking about the travails of the 1%. let's broaden the discussion. we'll bring in some more diverse voices from different people, different is. anybody want to enter the conversation, just raise your hand, calling you. people with makes will state their, affiliation and ask a question or make a comment. any questions or comments from the floor? yes, over here. >> thank you. i would like to ask you the following question. you have mentioned a number of tools such as cyberweapons, such as drones and special forces. they are not in themselves. they are just tools. to achieve what is the big issue it was a smart move, but he didn't resolve the iranian problems. same for other places. so my question is, don't you think that there is some kind of an biggie t. trying to use new, smart technology, that kind of stuff, pretending to get solutions and at the same time, let's say the political diplomatic approach doesn't provide solution in the end. so, isn't it a signal that we are sh
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 7:00am EDT
debate and sundays will make the endorsement for u.s. senate. in addition the story that is independent of the endorsement will publish on page one that profiles the race. and don't forget to vote. thank you. [applause] >> a few minutes ago i called president bush and congratulated him on his victory. and i know i speak for all of you and all the american people when i say that he will be our president and we will work with him as the nation faces major challenges the head and we must work together. >> i just received a telephone call from governor dukakis. [choosers]] i want you to know he was most gracious. his call was personal and genuinely friendly and it was in the great tradition of american politics. >> this weekend on american history tv, 20 years of presidential victory and concessions beaches. watch at 7:00 eastern and pacific. >> why would the assassin group, john wilkes booth team want to assassinate william henry seward? >> this has been the subject of some debate. some scholars think that booth realize in the event of the debt of both the president and vice pr
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:00pm EST
debts. in return, obama promised he would visit steve rogers' students, and if he won the u.s. senate seat, and speak to them. he did win the u.s. senate seat. rogers never heard from him so he called him up and he asked obama, would he come? and obam said, steve, i'm too busy. i'm getting phone calls from warren buffett and from steve jobs and bill gates and all these important people. and rogers said, you promised. and obama told him, well, you know, steve, you're not supposed to believe promises made by politicians, are you? and rogers got very angry. and demanded he show up. and eventually he did show up, obama. but the point of the story is that so many of the african-american leaders, businessmen and political people have spoken to for this book, told me similar stories in which they were there for him, for obama, on day one. they were what the call day-one people, supporting him, organizing for him, contributing to him, and that once he was elected to either the senate and then eventually to the presidency, they never heard again from him. there was a lack of gratitude. a lack
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 12:00pm EST
which involve not reducing the price of medical goods and services in the u.s. which are overpriced by oecd standards, not improving delivery system efficiency, but just rationing assets. if you had a separate, free-standing national conversation with no deadline, no sense of urgency what to do about the future of medicare and medicaid, and one group just said we want massive, permanent rationing of access to health care, again, that's not going to go anywhere. so if you favor cutting entitlements like social security and medicare and medicaid by methods like this, it makes perfect sense. you want to bury this in the fine print of legislation on another subject like averting the fiscal cliff. it's like putting a writer on something that has nothing to do with the defense department. that is i think the groups in the united states which for ideological reasons in the case of some parts of the financial industry for pecuniary or reasons want to cut social insurance and force people to buy more private, for-profit sector products like annuities or private health insurance. they know they
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 10:00pm EST
package -- i have one in my home -- you pay on average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france, you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and ten times faster downloading, and you're paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand, fundamental principle in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information super highway. and what does the industry say? don't call it that. the rest of the world -- >> did they literally say that. >> guest: i was told by the pr person at verizon that was not used anymore. that's the only company that actually has fiberoptic to your home. at&t has fiberoptic down the street but not to your home. but the companies are not
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 6:30am EST
administrations, i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years and times in israel. so it's a unique perspective looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> host: so, ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> guest: it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nation's that have the small majority in israel and our great country. and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies and islamic terrorism that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land. not just jews, but non-jews as well. so it's a quite r
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 7:30pm EST
historian of u.s. health care systems. [inaudible] very busy during the political season, beatrix, debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health care rights being in the air, everywhere you look these days. so as a -- [inaudible] and ak keepic in women history, i'm sure all of us are looking forward to the presentation. thank you for being here. you couldn't be in a better time for this talk either. such much of grand rap pieds has been very highly invested in the health care industry. hoping to develop seller health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health care here. i hope some of the visitors to town will be able to see what we call health bill on michigan so much of the investment in medical health-related work has been made. dr. hoffman is professor and chair and department of history at northern illinois. dekalb illinois. she completed her ph.d. as it seems everyone at my table did at rutgerss university in 1996. she's written expleasantively on the american health care r
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 12:00pm EST
and i have one in my home, you pay on average with taxes and use $160. in france you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries are not just u.s. and canada. you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and 10 times faster downloading, and your bank is than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand the fundamental principle, in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrial nation came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. the 20 century came along, it was highways, interstate highway program and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. what does industry say? don't call it that anymore. >> david cay johnson on many with corporations try to rob you blind saturday night at 10 eastern in sunday night at nine on afterwards this weekend on c-span2's booktv. >> more booktv programming next your c-span2 from the annual national book festival, susan hertog presents her book, "dangerous ambition: rebecca wes
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
the creation, the architect of the u.s. china relationship. it is sometimes, at least my sense, is there is a little bit of scolding about gosh, we did it this way forty years ago. so you sort of lost the hang of it. i would simply say the strategy that you adopt when you are trying to lure zen phobic general inward looking undergopped nation out in to the world are incredibly difficult, different from the strategies that you apply when you're dealing with the country that is rising faster than any country in history. with a very strong sense of itself, strong sense of nationalism, and how you engage and shape their global choices. and so i think it will be the dominant feature of american foreign policy going forward. i believe we will have a welcoming asia that wants a stronger engaged america. that's the biggest difference from my tenure to the tenure of the gentlemen. in the past, there was often some -- [inaudible] about the united states. no longer. everyone in asia wants more of the united states. and our job will be to see if we have the wisdom to sustain a very high level.
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 5:00pm EST
done. i understand that these tragedies require careful examination. i was a minimum of the u.s. house of representatives -- i was a member of the u.s. house of representatives when 235 u.s. marines died in a marine corps bear recollection bombing in beirut, lebanon. you bet we asked questions of the reagan administration, as we should when we lose american lives, innocent lives, overseas, as we did in lebanon and as we did in libya. what troubles me is the level the debate has reached. it has now preached a level of vilification and acould you scags which is unwarranted by the evidence. this week we met in the senate foreign relations committee in a closed, classified setting and went through meticulously the time line that led up to the death of the ambassador and his staff as well as what followed. it is being reported as it is being gathered, and there are additional reports that will be forthcoming. early next month, we are expecting the accountability review board of the department of state to issue its report. we know that following that, other committees of jurisdiction, the in
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 9:00am EDT
reserve and u.s. army reserve. army guard, u.s. army reserve and active. reductions as we go forward. and so how do i look at this? there is characteristics that are important. and people get confused with what's going on the last five years with what want to have any future. in my mind, what happened in iraq and afghanistan is exactly how we decided to happen. the active component responded initially, was able to get things established and then as we need it more, we are able to move into the national guard, and u.s. army reserve to help us with that. and it's gained of them have a significant amount of experience. that worked very well. now, the way we are organized now in the army, the are some reserve and national guard units have to be ready to deploy very quickly. those tend to be combat service support outfits and combat support outfits that require much less training capability, because the guard and reserves issue is time. it's not money, it's time. they only have so much time to sustain readiness. so the characteristics of an active component is rapidly deployable, higher r
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